Individuals, states, and the nation: Leading by example with Federalist platforms

If we’re going to change the way our nation’s government operates, we have to lead by example. There’s no better way to demonstrate the basic tenets of Federalism than to apply it to our party structure itself.

Our national party platform is the most basic one possible for a very important reason. Universal decrees at a national level in a country as big as ours are foolish. While other parties load up their platform with dozens or even hundreds of planks, we understand that having three principles as the foundation of our national platform will allow the states’ and individuals’ platforms to resonate with their people the best.

Keeping it simple, the national Federalist Party believes in:

  • Reining in the federal government to bring them to balance with the states as laid forth in the Constitution
  • Defending the freedoms we’re born with as Americans
  • Protecting life at all levels

Upon these three principles, states and individuals can develop the details to solve problems for their voters. If we were to expand the national platform, we would limit the ability of states and individuals to meet their own specific needs.

That’s not to say that it’ll be the Wild West with states plugging in planks that easily diverge from the core philosophies of Federalism. There is plenty implied within these three principles that will prevent false Federalism from superseding it. For example, one potential Federalist noted that we did not include a mandate to cut spending and taxes. There’s no need to note it because it’s universally understood as a measure necessary to rein in the federal government just like slashing bureaucracy and eliminating DC overreach. With these foundations in place, state and individual platforms will have enough space to flourish without being able to veer too far from our core beliefs.

Most will note that we mention both states and individuals. This is an important distinction for us as well because we want platforms in place for states as well as individual candidates and representatives. We need the states to control their own platforms because the needs of Floridians are different from the needs of Iowans. We need individual candidates and representatives to have their own platforms because the needs of voters in rural upstate New York or different from the needs of voters in New York City.

Federalist candidates and representatives will craft and present their own platforms for another reason. We are going to hold all Federalist representatives accountable to their promises. If they state one thing in their platforms and then act differently once in office, they won’t have to worry about the press or other politicians calling them out. We’ll be the first people knocking on their door with their signed and certified platform in hand asking why they broke their word. They won’t be able to dodge the question with a 30-second sound bite or a quick Tweet. They’ll need to give their voters a full explanation of what changed and why they failed to fulfill their platform promise. If the answers aren’t satisfactory, they will no longer deserve the support of Federalists.

It’s harsh, but all too often politicians will say one thing during campaign season then do something different once in office. That may be acceptable and even encouraged by other parties, but Federalists will hold them to a higher standard. We must.

We are building this party on firm principles because that’s precisely what America needs right now. The broken promises and slick manipulations that mark most politicians in other parties will not be tolerated by Federalists. Our growth and sustainability as a national party requires us to stay true to what Federalism really means. That’s why we’re confident that our message will resonate enough to make an impact faster than most expect.

One Comments

  • Doug Olson 03 / 05 / 2017 Reply

    I love this. I am forwarding it to everyone I know that is disenchanted with the current state of this government.

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