The one concern about the President’s climate agreement speech

There was nothing beneficial about the Paris climate agreement. It wasn’t good for the world and it definitely wasn’t good for America. We’ve always maintained that this particular piece of foreign policy has a clear resolution: President Obama should never have signed it and President Trump should remove us from it immediately.

Today, he did just that, but with a caveat:

No. We shouldn’t begin negotiations to re-enter. It can’t be fixed. It’s built on a false premise that globalizing the climate change combat initiative through disproportionate restrictions brought about by political maneuvers can fix the problem. It’s also based upon unverified assumptions. In the future, we’ll discuss the party’s stance on the environment, one that is based on real science rather than the political science that focuses solely on carbon emissions, but for this piece let’s look at a trend revealed further by today’s announcement.

Since declaring that only he (Trump) can fix our problems at the Republican National Convention last July, we’ve seen the way that the President likes to address pretty much every situation. He wants to fix everything. He wants to make deals. This is fine for some things, but the best solution in most situations is to remove federal government intervention altogether. This doesn’t seem to be on option for the Republicans (and it’s definitely not even a consideration in the Democrats’ playbook).

Of all the issues for which the President should say, “We’re getting out, period,” the Paris Climate Agreement is one of the most obvious. There’s no need to try to leave the door open for some future “fix.” Get out. Move on. Don’t look back. That he is still signaling the possibility that we can renegotiate our way back in is troublesome.

NAFTA. Obamacare. Planned Parenthood. Immigration. Mexico building the wall. Moving the U.S. embassy to Israel. Now, Paris. One of the biggest reasons Trump was elected is because many assumed he would be unflinching when keeping his promises. To be fair, he has demonstrated resolve in some situations, but most of his promises have been negotiable at best. It’s a trait that seems to have carried over from the previous administration.

We’re not saying that we agree with the President’s stance on all of the issues listed above, but we’d prefer that he act definitively in one direction or the other rather than tiptoe through everything by placing a “renegotiation” caveat on it. As we’ve stated before, Obamacare is an easy example of something that should be chopped apart without the government trying to fix it. The AHCA is not a repeal and replace. It’s a tweak and rebrand.

The same holds true for his stance on Israel. While everyone focused on the Paris agreement announcement, the other big news of the day is that the President decided to not move the U.S. embassy to Jerusalem “for now.” Some may say it’s just temporary, but these six-month waivers on the law have been going on for decades. It wouldn’t even cost us a thing; Israel would happily pay for the move if the President asked.

“We will move the American embassy to the eternal capital of the Jewish people, Jerusalem,” he said when campaigning. Why wait? Will things suddenly be better in the future? Will it be more acceptable to the Muslim world in six months? A year? Seven years?

We’re very pleased that the President pulled us out of the Paris agreement. We just wish he’d stop trying to renegotiate everything. Some things should be left to die in peace.

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