To those who want to fix the GOP from within…

Nobody likes to start from scratch, particularly when there’s been a lot of effort put into something. The two major political parties (or the single super-party, depending on how you look at it) have had decades of effort put in by many current members. Some of us have been lifelong Republicans or Democrats. It’s hard to imagine accepting that both are broken beyond repair.

This has been the biggest roadblock fort he Federalist Party to overcome. There are those feel like the Democratic-Republicans will be hard to fix, but it will still be easier than starting a new party. We could list several reasons why this isn’t the case, but I’ll start with the most important: IF the parties can be fixed, it will be BECAUSE of the rise of the Federalist Party. Please allow me a brief moment to explain.

Being a roadblock to the path of least resistance

Let’s stipulate a point that most with knowledge of the situation can agree upon: the GOP has been lurching to the left for some time. There were moments of clarity thanks to organizations like Heritage and the Tea Party when true small-government Federalists such as Mike Lee and Ted Cruz were able to come into office and make slight shifts, but these individuals have proven to be no match for the Establishment juggernaut that controls the GOP.

With that understood, one might ask why he GOP has done this. The reason is pretty simple. It’s because the Democrats have lurched to the left as well. As they are becoming more like America’s version of the Socialist Party, the GOP is becoming the Democratic Party of the 1990s. They will continue down this path regardless of how upset conservatives get because they know that being the less liberal of the two major parties means they don’t have to cater to a single demand from the right. Instead, they’ll continuously lie to us during campaign season knowing we won’t leave them (until now, that is).

We’re seeing it as this article is being written with the Affordable Care Act’s “repeal and replacement” plan. What the House was able to put forth was horrible. It’s government-controlled health care with a new name. The “repeal and replace” they passed was actually a “tweak and rebrand” of Obamacare. Now, the Senate is giving us something even more ludicrously leftist. It’s a pure indicator of the state of the GOP: only four or five Senators are opposed to the bill because of the big government monstrosity that it is. Ironically, some GOP Senators are opposed to it because they think it’s TOO conservative. That’s your modern day Republican Party, the other party of big government.

The Federalist Party must rise to be the true voice for small-government concepts that the GOP abandoned long ago. Until there’s a challenge from outside, any challenges from within the GOP will be disregarded. Those who oppose the status quo will be ostracized as Cruz learned very quickly. Those who promote small-government principles within the party will be ridiculed as “academics,” as Ben Sasse is learning.

Some very intelligent people are still holding onto hope that the GOP can be fixed from within and we don’t totally disagree. However, we are certain that this fix cannot happen without us. Until the GOP has a true challenger that promotes the philosophies most of them have abandoned, there will be no valid reason for them to be the party of small government. Big government principles win elections (at least that’s the rumor) so they will always be the party of slightly-smaller-government-than-the-Democrats until they are challenged.

Our argument is not that people should join us in order to fix the GOP. We think it’s much more likely we’ll be able to rise before the GOP is willing to change, but we know this for certain: if we do not rise, the GOP will only continue to lurch left.

Parties and caucuses and coalitions, oh my

Here’s the funny part about labels. They mean different things to different people. The Tea Party is a coalition. There are some old as well as emerging coalitions that are actually caucuses. Some caucuses such as the House Freedom Caucus would be better served by acknowledging they are actually part of the Federalist Party rather than being a relatively powerless Republican caucus.

In other words, organizations call themselves what they want to be called.

We are a party. There shouldn’t be any confusion about that, but here’s the thing. Whether we are a party, caucus, or coalition, our short-term goals are the same. We need to grow our ranks, form state organizations, raise funds, and start vetting out potential candidates.

This is important to understand because some of the very intelligent people mentioned above have quietly told us they’d prefer if we were a caucus or a coalition. We’ve explored those possibilities and realized they’re untenable. The Tea Party taught us that even a group unified by the most liberal of politicians to oppose could only muster minor and temporal success. As for caucuses, the most powerful such caucus can barely slow down the Establishment.

Whether one believes the parties can be fixed or not, the next step is the same. We must make the Federalist Party rise. Those who believe in reining in DC, defending freedoms, and protecting life can unite with us whether they want to fix the two-party system or not.

Comment List

  • Arlene Pearson 27 / 06 / 2017

    Ben Sasse may have been labelled an “academic” by the Governor of Iowa due to Sasse’s criticism of Trump, but from my observations of Sasse’s votes and speeches he is not an academic. Cruz and Lee are academics and true Constitutional Conservatives. Rand Paul also deserves honorable mention with Cruz and Lee. Sasse doesn’t deserve such mention imo.

  • Sue Sherrill 21 / 07 / 2017

    We tried to change the Republican Party. They have the mic switch!

Comments are closed.