Limiting government is almost always the answer

We have plenty of government. Too much. Some may look at it on the surface and surmise the problem is too many layers of government. From local government bodies all the way to DC, there are so many layers it’s often hard to know who has jurisdiction over what.

The problem isn’t with the layers of government. This is actually a good thing. The problem is that the “top” layer – the federal government – has enjoyed an incessant increase in power and scope over the decades, so much so that it’s now far too dominant. In a true federalist republic as it’s detailed in the Constitution, the federal government shares responsibilities with the states to handle much of the administrative requirements to operate the nation. The rest of the responsibilities fall to the people and are to be administered by individuals, families, communities, cities, and counties.

When we look at the problems we face today, most of them are directly or indirectly caused by TOO MUCH government, not too little. Americans have grown accustomed in recent years to expecting all solutions to be handed down from DC. This is due in part to the government inserting itself into situations where it doesn’t belong, but some of the blame can fall on the people. We have allowed this to happen. Instead of saying, “help us,” we should have been saying, “stay out of our way so we can help ourselves.”

The independent spirit exemplified by our founders and reaffirmed by countless Americans for over two centuries is what made our nation exceptional. Today, we’re losing that spirit. We’re willfully enabling (and often begging) DC to get involved when it shouldn’t.

To solve this problem, we need to remind Americans that the seat of power is in our hands, not in DC. We need to remind politicians they are our representatives, not our masters. We need to tell DC to stop expanding and start shrinking immediately.

We don’t need more government. We need to be limiting government’s reach and scope. Some of this means putting decisions back in the hands of states, local governments, and individuals. Education, for example, is an area that requires limited participation (if any at all) from Washington DC, yet the Department of Education reigns over our schools in ways that simply don’t make sense. We have the ability to do what’s best for our kids if government would get out of our way. We can improve education by localizing more decisions, putting choices back in the hands of the parents, and holding school districts, teachers, and even parents more accountable. Today, problems in schools are pushed up the ladder where DC bureaucrats attempt to solve problems through a national scope when the real solutions are available at the local level.

There are hundreds, perhaps thousands of examples of extreme federal government overreach that point to one logical conclusion: we should be limiting government, not expanding it.

Both parties in DC are bent on expanding their overreach. One is honest about their flawed thinking. The other campaigns on limited-government principles but only throws us token cuts while passing huge budgets and maintaining the ever-growing status quo. It’s time for Americans to embrace true limited-government federalism by supporting the one party that embraces the philosophy through and through.